How Entitled vs. Earned Positive Feedback Can Revolutionize Your Behavior Plan

Here’s the big question: How do teachers – who are being pulled in so many directions with so many demands and so much to do – make sure that they not only get through our lesson as planned, but also make sure that every child is noticed every day?

In this blog post, we’ll discuss how to make sure each child in your classroom feels empowered through a properly planned behavior plan built on daily positive feedback that every student is entitled to.

Key Factors for Successful Behavior Plans

Behavior plans are obviously very popular. A critical part of education is managing the behavior of the kids. Even when certain children have issues with behavior, if you have a clear comprehensive behavior plan, you have a much better handle on the situation. You have objectives and you can measure the progress more effectively.

Teachers are generally skilled at implementing and following through on comprehensive behavior plans. As a result, they tend to see great results. On the other hand, if a behavior plan seems to be failing, minor tweaks can make a big difference.

If your behavior plan doesn’t seem to be working, make sure that you’re checking off all three key factors to a successful behavior plan: communication, achievable goals, and a well-built points system.

Before you can even consider a behavior plan, you need to know if you have a strong enough foundation for the plan to stand. Very often, kids lack the support they need to respond effectively to a behavior plan.

The best way to combat this is to provide the child with more entitled positive feedback, instead of earned positive feedback. But what do we mean by that?

Entitlements vs. Earnings

There are three categories of things we give to children: entitlements, privileges, and earnings. For example, food is an entitlement; all children have a right to dinner. But going out for dinner to a nice restaurant is a privilege, and going to a child’s favorite restaurant because she did all of her designated chores for the day is an earning for good behavior.

Most teachers will set up such a point or incentive system as a part of their behavior plan. They may do individualized behavior plans for one or two students, or a class-wide point system to get everyone involved. The problem is, these points that the kids receive are earned, not entitled.

But here at ClasStars, we believe that a teacher must give kids positive feedback even if it’s not earned. Essentially, children cannot only receive positive feedback that they’re earning. There needs to be a level of interaction and engagement from the teacher as a basic right. So on top of positive feedback that is earned based on behavior, all children are entitled to positive feedback everyday regardless of how they’re behaving.

There’s a certain weight to positive feedback that’s earned; it’s valuable to acknowledge good work and good behavior. Nonetheless, as a teacher, you need to make sure that every child is engaged and receives positive feedback throughout the day.

And really, some would argue that the struggling students need positive feedback the most.

Revolutionizing Your Behavior Plan

We know behavior plans can be effective; in the form of a points or incentive system, it motivates students and helps teachers manage the classroom. When communication is clear, goals are achievable, and you have good support, amazing things can happen.

If your behavior plan seems to be failing despite these three things, then consider the fact that your classroom needs more entitled positive feedback. There’s a good chance that the struggling child simply needs more of the positive feedback that he’s entitled to in order to build a relationship where the teacher can really empower the child.

Children should not have to work hard to receive positive feedback every single day; they have a right to that. They deserve it.

And good news, teachers: once all of your students receive that baseline of positive feedback every day, incentive programs – like a points system – will begin to be effective across the classroom.

Take these things into consideration, and you have a good recipe for a very solid behavior plan that – with good support, dedicated teachers, and parents who are on board – will truly have a positive impact on your students.

Here’s the big question: How do teachers – who are being pulled in so many directions with so many demands and so much to do – make sure that they not only get through our lesson as planned, but also make sure that every child is noticed every day?

In this blog post, we’ll discuss how to make sure each child in your classroom feels empowered through a properly planned behavior plan built on daily positive feedback that every student is entitled to.

Key Factors for Successful Behavior Plans

Behavior plans are obviously very popular. A critical part of education is managing the behavior of the kids. Even when certain children have issues with behavior, if you have a clear comprehensive behavior plan, you have a much better handle on the situation. You have objectives and you can measure the progress more effectively. 

Teachers are generally skilled at implementing and following through on comprehensive behavior plans. As a result, they tend to see great results. On the other hand, if a behavior plan seems to be failing, minor tweaks can make a big difference. 

If your behavior plan doesn’t seem to be working, make sure that you’re checking off all three key factors to a successful behavior plan: communication, achievable goals, and a well-built points system.

Before you can even consider a behavior plan, you need to know if you have a strong enough foundation for the plan to stand. Very often, kids lack the support they need to respond effectively to a behavior plan.

The best way to combat this is to provide the child with more entitled positive feedback, instead of earned positive feedback. But what do we mean by that?

Entitlements vs. Earnings

There are three categories of things we give to children: entitlements, privileges, and earnings. For example, food is an entitlement; all children have a right to dinner. But going out for dinner to a nice restaurant is a privilege, and going to a child’s favorite restaurant because she did all of her designated chores for the day is an earning for good behavior.

Most teachers will set up such a point or incentive system as a part of their behavior plan. They may do individualized behavior plans for one or two students, or a class-wide point system to get everyone involved. The problem is, these points that the kids receive are earned, not entitled.

But here at ClasStars, we believe that a teacher must give kids positive feedback even if it’s not earned. Essentially, children cannot only receive positive feedback that they’re earning. There needs to be a level of interaction and engagement from the teacher as a basic right. So on top of positive feedback that is earned based on behavior, all children are entitled to positive feedback everyday regardless of how they’re behaving.

There’s a certain weight to positive feedback that’s earned; it’s valuable to acknowledge good work and good behavior. Nonetheless, as a teacher, you need to make sure that every child is engaged and receives positive feedback throughout the day. 

And really, some would argue that the struggling students need positive feedback the most.

Revolutionizing Your Behavior Plan

We know behavior plans can be effective; in the form of a points or incentive system, it motivates students and helps teachers manage the classroom. When communication is clear, goals are achievable, and you have good support, amazing things can happen. 

If your behavior plan seems to be failing despite these three things, then consider the fact that your classroom needs more entitled positive feedback. There’s a good chance that the struggling child simply needs more of the positive feedback that he’s entitled to in order to build a relationship where the teacher can really empower the child. 

Children should not have to work hard to receive positive feedback every single day; they have a right to that. They deserve it.

And good news, teachers: once all of your students receive that baseline of positive feedback every day, incentive programs – like a points system – will begin to be effective across the classroom.  

Take these things into consideration, and you have a good recipe for a very solid behavior plan that – with good support, dedicated teachers, and parents who are on board – will truly have a positive impact on your students.